Congratulations BYU Putnam Team!

This past year more than 4200 students at 570 institutions participated in the Putnam Mathematical Competition, with a median score of 2. Our Putnam team placed 21st nationally, and one of our team members ranked in the top 100 (Thomas Draper, placed 90.5 with a score of 51) and one other ranked in the top 200 (Daniel South, placed 168 with a score of 40).

Fifteen other participants received non-zero scores.

Trevor Garrity (20)Dylan Webb (10)Hephi Suyama (7)Nathaniel Neubert (2)
Tyler Mansfield (19)Benjamin Baker (9)Nathaniel Robinson (4)Yvonne Andrewsen (1)
Jacob Murri (18)Suzanna Stephenson (9)Alexander Lee (2)Hunter Johnson (1)
Andrea Barton (12)Kevin Tuttle (8)Elizabeth Melville (2)

What is the Putnam Competition?

According to the Putnam Competition website https://www.maa.org/math-competitions/putnam-competition

The William Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition is the preeminent mathematics competition for undergraduate college students in the United States and Canada. The Putnam Competition takes place annually on the first Saturday of December. The competition consists of two 3-hour sessions, one in the morning and one in the afternoon. During each session, participants work individually on 6 challenging mathematical problems.

The Putnam began in 1938 as a competition between mathematics departments at colleges and universities. Now the competition has grown to be the leading university-level mathematics examination in the world. Although participants work independently on the problems, there is a team aspect to the competition as well. Institutions are ranked according to the sum of the scores of their three highest-scoring participants. Prizes are awarded to the participants with the highest scores and to the departments of mathematics of the five institutions the sum of whose top three scores is greatest.

The six mathematical problems in the competition are so challenging that the median score is often zero out of a possible 120 points. The competition is sponsored by the Mathematical Association of America.